Tag Archives: rights holder advice

This Week in Links: January 6 – 10

We’re back with our first weekly links roundup of 2014! We’ve got lots of great stuff planned for the blog in 2014, from collaboration to education, all designed to bring you the best in audiobook information! Take the year’s first trip around the audiobook web, and make sure to hit the “Follow” button on the right to stay up to date on the latest from the ACX blog.

For Rights Holders:

Ten Publishing Predictions for 2014 – via Bob Mayer’s Write on The River – Self-publishing success story looks into his crystal ball to see what 2014 has in store.

Writing Novels: How to Get the Balance Right Between Fact & Fiction – via ALLi Self-Publishing Advice Blog – Your novel may be based in fact, but is it believable? Lucy McCarraher breaks down the important distinction between the two.

Transitions (Video) – via Wordplay With Nika Harper – You character is here, but she needs to get there. But how? Nika covers scene transitions in this fun video from her Wordplay series.

The Science Behind a Bestseller – via GalleyCat – Are there certain words that will ensure your book will sell? GalleyCat is on the case.

For Producers:

New Year, New Gig: Audible Studios/ACX Open Casting! – via The ACX Blog – Here’s your exclusive chance to work with the Grammy Award-winning producers at Audible studios. Submit your audition now!

Removing Mouth Noises (Video) – via Edge Studios – Home studio master George Whittam shares techniques for getting clean sounding audio in this video.

The DUH! list – via The ACX Blog – Earlier this week, we shared our 7 habits of highly effective audiobook professionals. A must read for all audiobook narrators/producers!

The Top Voiceover Blog Posts of 2013 – via Derek Chappell’s Voiceover Blog – Take a look back at  Derek’s picks for the best of 2013.

What was the best audiobook article you read this week? Tell us in the comments!

An Offer They Can’t Refuse

Earlier this week, we discussed selecting an audition script for your book once it’s been posted to ACX. Today, let’s tackle the next step for authors and rights holders: casting your title and making an offer. This is an important step that can ensure that your production goes smoothly.

Casting the right producer.

mike-charzuk-exec-prod-audible-com

Mike Charzuk

Only you know who has the perfect voice for your story or characters. Among the 10,000+ producers on ACX, you’re bound to find some fantastic narrators. Mike Charzuk, Executive Producer/Sr. Director of Audible Studios, advises you to know your text well and cast to your narrator’s strengths.

When casting, it is important to know the text inside and out. If the text is complex with many characters, then an actor that is facile with character delineation and accents would be advised. Remember, subtle is the way to go with accents and character choices; you don’t want the narrator to sound to cartoonish and over the top. If the text is nonfiction, then a voice that is engaging is optimal. Remember to cast nonfiction to the strengths of the actor. Someone that might be not be good with complex verbiage may not do well on a book about ancient Greek language, for example.

You should also be listening to the technical aspects of the audition. The auditions you receive should be indicative of the final audio quality your producer will deliver once they begin producing your title. We recommend listening to some samples of well rated audiobooks on Audible to get a sense of what a good production sounds like. If you have reservations about the sound quality, feel free to politely discuss them with the potential producer or pass on the audition.

Making an offer.

Consider a few things when making an offer on ACX. As you post your title, you may have already chosen what payment method you’ll use, but if you’ve offered your title as royalty share or pay-for-production (P4P), you’ll now need to commit to one or the other. Next, you’ll choose exclusive or non-exclusive distribution, and offer due dates for the 15 minute checkpoint and final audio.

It’s important to understand the amount of time that goes into producing an audiobook when deciding on due dates. See this post for information on how long it can take to produce your audio. Based on this, a good estimate for the length of time needed on an average ACX production is roughly 45 days. It’s always a good idea to discuss the production timeline with your potential producer via the ACX messaging system before making an offer.

Help your producer help you.

One final thing to note is that you should be prepared to send your producer a copy of the final, published version of your book as soon as they accept your offer. You should also include any additional notes that you can regarding character voices and pronunciations. Putting your producer in the best position to produce your title ensures that you’ll end up with a great audiobook.

Are you ready to make an offer for your book? Tell us how you set yourself up to get the best audiobook possible from your ACX productions in the comments!