Tag Archives: audiobooks

This Week in Links: January 2- January 6

FOR RIGHTS HOLDERS:

5 Steps to Set Writing Goals You’ll Actually Achieve– via The Write Practice – Coming up with goals is easy. Coming up with goals that will make you a better writer can be a bit harder.

The Book Marketing Strategy –via Book Marketing Buzz Blog – January sees some of the biggest spikes in sales after people have been given Audible memberships for the holidays. Keep on marketing!

ACX Storytellers: Ryan Winfield – via The ACX Blog – ACX has numerous success stories, Ryan Winfield is one of our favorites. Ryan explains why he decided to retain his audio rights and passed on working with a major publisher to work with ACX.

FOR PRODUCERS:

6 Things you Can Do NOW to Get Started in Voiceover – via Voiceover Herald – It’s easy to procrastinate when you’re not sure how to get started. Avoid that issue with this helpful article to jump start your narration career.

10 Social Media Trends Giving Brands New Ways to Engage in 2017 – via Adweek – Social media is essential to establishing your brand and properly marketing yourself. Find out the best ways to engage with your audience in the New Year.

ACX University Presents: Finding Your Voice Part 1 –The ACX Blog – Before you  dive into audiobook narration, discover your voice so you can find the appropriate projects. Travel back to ACX University 2015 for some starting tips.

This Week in Links: October 31 – November 4

For Producers:

Secrets From Successful Voice-Overs – via Paul Strikwerda – It’s easy to view your path as a Boulevard of Broken Dreams; your peers offer their best advice to make sure you don’t get stuck there.

How Punctuation Marks Help You Read Voice Over Scripts Better – via Voice Over Herald – “Punctuation is important for voice overs as it works as an aid in reading, phrasing, and in the overall interpretation of the script.”

How To Pick A Voice Over Conference To Attend – via Marc Scott – Learning and networking at an industry event is a great way to advance your career. Might we humbly suggest you join us at That’s Voiceover next week?

5 Things You Should Do for Your VO Business Before the End of the Year – via Dave Courvoisier – Don’t wait until January to take stock and set yourself up for another successful year.

For Rights Holders:

Which Demographic Do You Promote Your Book To? – via BookMarketingBuzzBlog – “When promoting – and writing – a book, one must always think about the readership demographics.  Which types of media will you pursue?  What kind of fan do you hope to create?”

Book Marketing Success & Failure [PODCAST] – via Book Marketing Tools – Bestselling author A.J. Cosmo shares what he’s learned from his promotional efforts that worked… or didn’t.

Favorite Ways to Promote a Virtual Book Tour – via Build Book Buzz – Learn how to make the most out of your online book tour efforts without ever leaving your office.

Simplify Your Social Media Marketing: Set Up Outpost Channels – via Smart Marketing for Authors – Build a presence on your lesser-used social platforms in order to boost your efforts on those you can dedicate more time to.

This Week in Links: August 1 – 5

This week’s #ACXU2016 live stream contained a lively and informative discussion on building and maintaining your actor brand. Featuring branding and social media experts from Audible as well as actor/author Gabra Zackman, this panel is a must-watch for Producers and Rights Holders alike. View the video below, then continue your audiobook education with this week’s recommended links.

For Rights Holders:

11 Ways to Overcome Marketing Dread – via Digital Book World – Many authors love writing but fear marketing. Find out how to bridge the gap with these tips.

Great Tips For Branding Your Book Series – via Book Marketing Tools – The same way that your business has a logo, and colors, and a style of presenting things, so too should your books have branding.

Marketing a New Book: 6 Tactics Authors & Publishers Love – via BookBub – With so many ways to market your (audio)books, it can be tough to figure out which to focus on. This post recommends some tactics to focus on, with easy-to-follow examples.

Get A Second Opinion On Your Book Marketing – via BookMarketingBuzzBlog – Seek the advice of others if your marketing isn’t working as well as you’d like. “Sometimes a small repair can fix a big problem”

For Producers:

Does It Make Sense To Outsource Proofing, Correcting & Packaging? – Voice-Over Xtra – A good look at the things that go into a decision to farm out your post production work.

Burnout Can Torch Your Throat – via Dr. Ann Utterback – Stress can take it’s toll on your voice. Dr. Utterback has some advice to help you avoid stretching yourself too thin to perform well.

How to be Believable – via Paul Strikwerda – “As a (voice) actor, it is your job to sell your lines so that the audience is buying it. In order for them to believe in what you’re saying, they have to believe that you believe it yourself. How do you do that?”

Sidestep the Snake Oil – via Steven Jay Cohen – A  changing industry has opened opportunities for new careers in voiceover, as well as some who seek to take advantage of those just starting out. Learn how to avoid opportunists who might not have your best interests at heart.

This Week in Links: July 25 – 29

We reached the halfway point of the summer semester of #ACXU2016 with this Wednesday’s panel, our Studio Gear Review. We covered the four essential pieces of equipment in your recording chain, showcased budget and high end setups, and learned what Audible Studios uses to create their Grammy and Audie award-winning productions.

Watch the panel below, and join us Wednesday, August 3rd at 4pm ET for Hey, I Know You!: Creating and Maintaining Your Actor Brand.

For Producers:

The Studio Gear Series – The ACX Blog – Want to learn even more about audiobook home studios, recording chains, and production best practices? Read our previous posts on the topic here.

[VIDEO] The Conversational Read: Relax into Your Voice and Become Comfortable with It – via Voice-Over Xtra – How can you ease into a natural read and shake that “announcer” sound? Watch to find out.

The Worst Acting Advice Ever – Via Paul Strikwerda – What separates a professional from a wannabe behind the mic? The answer may be more basic than you think.

What Parts of Your Voiceover Business Can You Outsource? – via Victoria DeAnda – It’s the narrator’s eternal question: beyond voicing the material, how do you find the balance between doing it yourself and hiring help?

For Rights Holders:

Author Marketing Mastery #30: Seven Ways to Build Readership Using YouTube – via where writers win – Find seven ways to get attention on YouTube, along with some general hints for success.

How to Write Subtext in Dialogue – via Helping Writers Become Authors – Find out how to write masterful dialogue that comes alive in your narrator’s telling.

7 Easy Ways tob Connect with Readers – via The Write Practice – These days, more writers means a more competitive marketplace than ever for the eyes and ears of your fans. A successful author will actively think about how they earn their attention.

Stranger-Than-Fiction Writing Habits of 18 Famous Writers – via Writer’s Digest – This fun infographic offers a peek at the odds ways writers find their muse.

This Week in Links: July 4 – 8

For Rights Holders:

Authors: You NEED A Mailing List – via BookMarketingTools – Learn how to grow a stable of people to market to that are yours and yours alone.

How to Prepare for Self-Publishing: Marketing – via Digital Book World – Check out this helpful list of seven ways to get your book in front of as many people as possible.

Rewriting the 7 Rules of Dialogue – via Writers Digest – Writing authentic dialogue is especially important for audiobook authors.

Author Marketing Mastery #27: Pinterest for Authors – via where writers win – Three helpful examples of authors using the social platform to promote their books.

For Producers:

ACX University 2016 – via ACX – Classes start Wednesday! Find out about upcoming topics, download calendar reminders, and get ready by watching last year’s panels.

Staying Front of Mind in Your Voice Over Network – via Voice Over Herlad – Read about using personal engagement to make a lasting impression on those you work with and work for.

What AGE is Your Voice? – via CourVO – What are your thoughts on the debate between the importance of how old you are vs. how old you sound?

Summer Heat Can Make You Sick – via Dr. Ann Utterback – Don’t let the dog days ruin your voice. Get the doctor’s ten tips for vocal health this summer.

This Week in Links: June 27 – July 1

ACX_University_logo_FINALHave you heard the news? We’re taking ACX University online, with six interactive, live streamed panels coming your way Wednesdays this summer starting July 13. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to get notified about our interactive sessions covering audiobook production, performance, and business topics. Then, check out our favorite links from the past week below.

For Producers:

[VIDEO] ACX University 2015 – via ACX – Get ready for this year’s event by catching up on our panels from last year.

Periscope: A New Way to Market a Voiceover Business – via Victoria DeAnda – Get some idea for promoting your VO services using Twitter’s live video streaming platform.

Recharging the Batteries – via Rob Marley – Learn how even a small break from focusing on your voiceover routine can pay dividends.

Busting Five Voice-Over Myths – via Nethervoice – Learn the truth behind  the most common misconceptions about a career in voice acting.

For Rights Holders:

How to Develop an Author Website and Blog – via IngramSpark – “Your author website is the center of all activity for promoting your writing. Done right, it provides the foundation for success in marketing and promoting your books.”

Fiction Writers: A Simple Approach to Build a Better Email List – via The Book Designer – Learn about the success you can achieve by choosing a smaller target audience.

Online Marketing for Authors – via BookMarketingTools – From content marketing to SEO, this comprehensive guide covers many of the digital marketing topics authors need to learn.

The First Wave – via CreateSpace – What is your first wave, and why is it so important to your marketing efforts? Click through to find out.

This Week in Links: May 23 – 27

For Producers:

Five Alternate Streams of Income as a Voiceover Artist – via Victoria DeAnda – “While this business can be quite lucrative and exciting at times, many voiceover artists want more from their talent.”

Zip Through Your Day, Get Everything Done Seriously! Six Tips For Boosting Productivity – via Voice-Over Xtra – Learn how to manage the limited hours in your day to get the most out of your VO career.

Why You Need To Set A Deadline – via Marc Scott – When setting a goal, you’ll go a long way towards successful completion by setting a deadline.

For Rights Holders:

How to Host a Facebook Launch of Your Self-published Book – via ALLi – Learn 10 steps to successfully host a virtual book (or audiobook!) launch party on the popular social network.

5 Things Most Self-Publishing Authors Overlook – via Book Marketing Tools – “To avoid making the common mistakes, review the following 5 things you should always check off your pre-publishing list.”

Do Writers Offer A Dialogue Or A Rant? – via BookMarketingBuzzBlog – “The good author…tries to think like the reader and understands the assumptions, standards, and knowledge that such readers operate under.”

 

 

This Week in Links: April 25 – 29

For Rights Holders:

How to Save Money and Do Online Book Publicity Yourself – via Jane Friedman – “[P]ublicity is not rocket science. If you are committed to the process, you can do it yourself.”

12 Common Writing Errors Even Bestselling Authors Make – via BookBub – Some of these can be real audiobook killers, too.

12 Ways Book Publishers Can Improve Facebook Engagement – via BookBusiness – Find out how to make the most of social media’s biggest platform.

The Indie Authors Business Guide – via Publishers Weekly – Learn the pros and cons of becoming a business entity.

For Producers:

How To Get The Rest You Need To Perform Your Best – via Voice-Over Xtra – Here are five tips to ensure you’re getting enough sleep to perform at a high level.

Do You Need a “Change of Pace”? – via VoiceBank.net – This post outlines a simple exercise you can add to your practice routine to help control the speed at which you read.

(INFOGRAPHIC) Have You Been Pronouncing These 30 Brand Names Incorrectly? – via Bobbin Beam – A good resource for VO’s, and some of the pronunciations may surprise you!

The History of Mind the Gap: The Voice in The Crowd – via Voice Over Herald – Learn the story of the famous message – and the voice behind it – from London’s Tube.

This Week in Links: February 1 – 5

For Rights Holders:

98 Book Marketing Ideas That Can Help Authors Increase Sales – via BookBub – That’s a LOT of book marketing ideas – and most apply to your audiobook marketing as well.

Improve Your Writing Platform (or Author Platform) in 30 Days – via Writer’s Digest – A well developed platform is the groundwork for strong audiobook marketing efforts.

Author Groups to Help You Write, Publish, and Promote Your Books – via The Book Designer – Being an indie author doesn’t mean doing it all alone. Check out this list of helpful resources for writers.

Marketing Tip: Keep Your Email Signature Clean – via CreateSpace – “When authors try to include too much about themselves and their books in their signatures, it looks messy, really messy.”

For Producers:

Voice-Over’s Seven Deadly Sins – via Nethervoice – Do you need to confess to committing one or more of these voiceover vices?

Want To Book More Auditions? Rethink How You React To Frequent Rejection – via Voice-Over Xtra – Everyone in the voiceover world gets rejected multiple times per week. It’s not always about you.

Picking the Right Royalty Share Projects – via The ACX Blog – Author/producer Craig Tollifson discusses how he reviews potential royalty share productions. Click through to read or listen to his advice.

Vocal Recording: Delivery and Enunciation – via The Journey – A look at the art of pronunciation through the lens of recording singers.

Picking the Right Royalty Share Projects

Like to listen? Click on the player below to hear this post in audio.

 

As an author, actor, and audiobook producer, Craig Tollifson brings a unique perspective to ACX. His publishing industry background has allowed him to make the most of the time he spends auditioning by putting his effort into the most promising titles. He joins us today to share his tips for picking the best Royalty Share projects.

Craig Tollifson_Headshot

ACX Author/Narrator Craig Tollifson (aka Andrew Tell)

The first audiobook I narrated went on sale in early 2015. It sold 11 copies. Since then, I’ve narrated 19 other titles, learned a lot about narrating, and learned even more about choosing good Royalty Share projects. This month I’ll pass 10,000 total sales, and recently averaged over 1,500 sales a month. And those numbers just keep going up. Not bad for a beginner!

I got my start on ACX as an author. I had my novella, The Junior Arsonists Club, produced as an audiobook by the talented Amy McFadden. I was interested in eventually narrating my own work, and had experience as a stage actor, so I decided to jump in and try it myself. Now I’m a full-time audiobook narrator and no one can say it’s weird that I sit in a giant box and talk to myself all day.

Having been on the other side of the fence as an independent author has helped shape my choices as a narrator. I knew from the start I wanted to pursue Royalty Share projects. For years I’ve followed the indie publishing scene and noted a parade of successes, like Hugh Howey, Michael Bunker, and many more. The potential to earn more than a regular Per-Finished-Hour rate over the long term and gain passive income was very appealing. I also knew that I had to be smart in choosing the right projects. I had to get good at picking the books with the most potential for success.

ACX gives you the basic research right on the project page. Now, let’s assume you’re skilled at narration, you’re interested in the project, and your voice is a good fit for the work. Here are some of the key points to consider:

  • Genre makes a difference. Fiction accounts for nearly 80% of audiobooks sold, with mystery/thrillers and sci-fi/fantasy being near the top. Stick with popular genres if you want to sell.
  • The Amazon sales rank can be very important for predicting success. This number represents sales per day compared to every other book in the Amazon store. Audiobook and eBook sales tend to rise and fall together. Remember, this is one product on two platforms. The lower the sales rank, the better! Without going into too much detail: a sales rank under one hundred is amazing. Run to the booth and start auditioning! A sales rank in the thousands is pretty great (remember there are over a million books in the Amazon store!). When you get over a hundred thousand, or two hundred thousand or more, well…that’s not so great. But remember: this rank is only a snapshot of one moment which represents that day’s trend. Message the Rights Holder on ACX to see how the book has been selling historically. Oftentimes, a great rank can be the result of a recent promotion, and when the promotion’s over it can completely sink again. Also, make sure the number you’re looking at is the paid rank. If the book is free, the rank loses a lot of its meaning and is not a good predictor of audiobook sales.
  • The more reviews thJunior Arsonists.jpge better, and the reviews should be mostly positive. Take some time and read some of those reviews. I recommend reading the most recent reviews, as early reviews are often solicited. Click through some of the reviewers themselves and check their profiles–if it’s the only book they’ve reviewed, it’s likely they are friends or family of the author and shouldn’t be considered. Reviews are also great for quickly getting a sense of the story, often more so than the author’s description, or first few pages of the book.
  • Length of time on sale is a great metric when combined with the number of reviews and sales rank. A book that’s selling great, and has been on the market for, say, two years may have better potential than a book that’s only been out for two weeks with the same sales rank.
  • Evaluate the rest of the author’s catalog–every last book–with the same criteria as the one up for production: sales rank, reviews, etc. If they have other audiobooks, even better. Ask the Rights Holder how many copies the other audiobooks have sold. Or, check to see how many ratings the other audiobooks have on Audible. More ratings mean more copies have been purchased.

Now that you’ve done your research, you need to define success. Though you’re not working for a Per-Finished-Hour (PFH) rate when producing Royalty Share projects, you should still be thinking about how much you hope to earn. What is your time worth? Recording usually takes around 2 hours in the studio for every finished hour of audio. Then there’s editing, proofing, and mastering, which can add 3-4 hours (or more!) per finished hour of audio. You could easily be putting in 6 hours for every finished hour.  With all that in mind, come up with your ideal PFH rate for the project. Multiply it by the length of the book in hours. Now, divide that total with a ballpark royalty and you’ll see how many copies you’ll need to sell to be satisfied that you’ve made a good decision. Do you really think the audiobook can sell that many copies? Does the Rights Holder? If you’re on the fence about a project, I find that thinking about earnings goals can help cement a decision.

Once the book is produced and on the market, you and the Rights Holder both have a stake in its success. Before you jump into your next production, spend some time marketing. I spend time every week promoting titles via giveaways and soliciting reviews. Social media can be a great resource if you find the right communities. There are a ton of places online that fans gather to discuss their favorite genre, like Goodreads, reddit, and many Facebook groups. Get yourself into those communities. You’ll meet fans and authors, both of which will help your audiobook career.

The last thing you’ll need is a little bit of luck. All the points of research can add up to the best looking potential project on the planet, and you can do great promotion, but still…the audiobook may not sell well! Royalty Share comes with an element of risk. Your job is to find the ones with the best odds.

I hope that the research tips I’ve given you today can help you choose the best bets for success.

Craig Tollifson is the author of the Kindle Single the Junior Arsonists Club, the forthcoming novel Happy, and has written for Mystery Science Theater 3000. When he’s not writing or performing on stage, he narrates audiobooks under the name Andrew Tell. He lives with his wife and kids in sunny Los Angeles, California.