Tag Archives: acx university

Caitlin Kelly’s Recipe for Success

Caitlin Kelly HSAudible Approved Producer Caitlin Kelly recently appeared in an episode of ACX University and talked about the importance of vocal health. Her secret? A special tea that soothes her vocal chords. We invited Caitlin to share it with you today.

I have one “go-to” for when my voice is fatigued. It could be from a particularly rigorous recording session or from a night out with friends and a few cocktails. So, when I have vocal swelling from overuse or dehydration, I turn to a hot cup of apple cider vinegar and honey. This elixir was introduced to me in college by my vocal performance teacher, Alix Korey – a broadway diva who drinks coffee and smokes cigarettes all day – and it has been part of my vocal care regimen ever since. I think of it as hot bath and a warm hug for my throat. Here’s how I make it:
Caitlin Recipe

The heat will relax and soothe the muscles in your throat. Use 4 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, or however much you can stand (this stuff is strong for the uninitiated). I use Bragg, which is unfiltered and raw. Shake up that bottle, and dump it in the hot water. The sediment is good for you – it’s called “the mother,” and it’s said to help in a number of ways: aiding digestion, balancing the pH of the body, and supporting the immune system. I swear by it to care for my voice. Honey is a humectant, which means it retains moisture. It will coat your throat and protect it while you rest your voice.

You might also try adding lemon juice. If you have mucus, the citric acid can help cut through it. A touch of cinnamon adds anti-inflammatory properties. Play around with the measurements. These are not hard and fast ratios or anything; just my own preference.

Now, I’m going to be honest with you: this stuff smells like feet. But it will make your vocal folds so happy, you will see the strong smell as a small discomfort compared to the restorative effects of the tonic!

What are some of your favorite tricks for resting and/or healing tired vocal folds?

Caitlin Kelly has been doing voice over since 2009. She got started in VO while living in Tokyo, Japan. Since diving into audiobook narration in 2014, Caitlin has recorded over 35 books. Caitlin can be heard daily reading the news on smashd.co and weekly in the Time for Kids app. To hear more from Caitlin, check out her site www.CaitlinKellyVO.com.

This Week in Links: August 15 – 19

The final week of #ACXU2016 featured advice on Taking Your Career to the Next Level, with tips from the casting directors of Audible Studios, Blackstone Audio, and Eljin Productions. Watch below to learn how established studios find new talent as well as the do’s and don’ts of interacting with audiobook professionals once you’ve got your foot in the door.

For Producers:

ACX University 2016 – via ACX – If you missed any of this summer’s panels, bookmark this playlist to round out your audiobook education.

The Big Secret To Audio Book Success – via Paul Strikwerda – What does it take to excel as an audiobook performer? A study of Jim Dale’s career provides one possible answer.

How to Master Voiceover Character Skills – via Gravy For The Brain – Learn what you could be doing every day, everywhere you go, to improve your VO character work.

[PODCAST] Drugs Can Help Your Voice Over Marketing! – via Voice-Over Xtra – Should VO’s take marketing cues from big businesses, like pharmaceutical companies?

For Rights Holders:

10 Sure-Fire Ways To Get Media For Your Book – via BookMarketingBuzzBlug – Read some surprising thoughts on “what really works when seeking to capture the mind share of the news media.”

Marketing Tip: Connect with Book Bloggers – Via CreateSpace – At a loss for how to find people to review your (audio)book? Check out this handy list.

A Quick Start Guide to Using MailChimp for the Email Marketing of Self-published Books – via ALLi – Find out how to leverage email to automate marketing and connect better with readers.

10 Ways To Hook Your Reader (and Reel Them in for Good) – via Writer’s Digest – Any prose written to hook a reader will also give your narrator something juicy to voice!