Bob Mayer on “the power of ACX”

For almost a year now, bestselling author Bob Mayer has been using ACX to turn his many books into audiobooks. We’re thrilled to have such a prolific and self-empowered author on board, and we’re delighted that he’s agreed to share a few thoughts on ACX and how the service has helped him, below. Enjoy!

Whenever I talk to other authors, I always ask them if they know about ACX and I am often surprised when they indicate they haven’t.  In many ways, I believe the ACX system is a template for success in the digital age, matching content creators with distributors, and then bringing the product to market in a seamless and efficient manner.

My first title on Audible via ACX went live in December 2011.  Initially, as I learned how to use ACX, I moved slowly, with only one other title going live that month.  Since then, though, as I saw sales accelerate, I began putting multiple titles into production.  Just recently, my 27th title went live.   I have three in production and four more queued up for production.  The reason they’re in line is I’ve found talent I like working with as I’ve gained experience on ACX, and we message back and forth to develop our own production schedule.  This means I am in complete control of the process, working with the narrator, who coordinates his schedule with my needs.

In essence, ACX allows me complete control of my “audio empire.”  Sales accrue daily, and to me this is an essential part of the “long tail” that is the core of success for an author.  The other critical component is more content.  As I bring out new titles, I slide them into the production schedule.

What’s even more interesting is that when I compare my ACX sales to my royalty statements from a few of my books that are still controlled by a Big 6 publisher, there is no comparison in sales, just as my indie eBook sales outsell my Big 6 eBook sales. For perspective, one day of my own sales beats six months of legacy sales.

I recently received an email from Bella Andre expressing her happiness at her first ACX production going live and the resulting sales figures.  I told Bella about ACX at Digital Book World back in January and she’s quickly jumped on board.  I’ve even seen some of the narrators I work with promoting my books on social media.

My father is legally blind, and as a World War II vet, has access to an antiquated audiobook program (using cassettes) from the VA.  When I brought him home to visit I immediately bought him a Kindle, set him up with an Audible account, and brought up a book I’d had published after he could no longer read.  I had it produced earlier this year via ACX, an 18 hour epic—Duty, Honor, Country:  A Novel of West Point & The Civil War.  Two days later my father finished it and we spent hours talking about it.  Since then he’s been devouring books from Audible.

This is the power of ACX.  I believe the ACX program is an essential ingredient in the success of any indie author.

7 responses to “Bob Mayer on “the power of ACX”

  1. I believe it is just the start of something that will be viewed as a standard in the future. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.
    Lynn

  2. Agreed. Well done, Bob! Hopefully more successful authors will follow you to ACX.

    Wayne

  3. Bob is my publisher and has brought back several of my backlist books to life, AND has launched my debut thriller to early acclaim. I’m in the process of setting up my recording studio with updated equipment (based on recommendations fro ACX)–yes, in another life I’m an actor–and look forward to working with the company!

  4. As an author considering audiobooks and currently being approached by audiobook publishers, I’d love to hear more about the time commitment required to produce and distribute your audio titles, Bob.

  5. Pingback: The most important writing tip: Keep writing - Venture Galleries

  6. Wow! An 18 hour Audible book; Outstanding! I see the ebook is 460 pages. I’ve noticed many Authors hovering around the 8 hour mark. I assume listeners want the same story actual readers experience. What seems to be the standard? Do Authors typically include the full-length of their books in audio format? What do readers seem to prefer? Any insight (from anyone) is appreciated. Thanks!

  7. Pingback: Amazon-owned Audible lowers royalty rates on self-published audiobooks — Tech News and Analysis

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